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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
mohamed morsi returned to cairo palace after fleeing last night. tens of thousands of protesting the constitution, the trap is set for a vote on december 15. riot police have been deployed to separate supporters and opponents of president morsi. anti-morsi protesters that he is stripped judiciary of power and rushing through his constitution backed by largely islamist handle. egyptian president has said the referendum vote on the constitution draft will go on as planned despite protests. lori: it is a shocking. unreal. melissa: paying the price for hurricane sandy, fema asking for more money to foot the bill. how does the federal government plan to pay for this? lori: the social networking site moving up in the world. how investors could benefit the head. want to try to crack it? yeah, that's the way to do it! now we need a little bit more... [ male announcer ] at humana, we understand the value of quality time and personal attentio which is why we are proud to partner with health care professionals who understand the difference that quality time with our members can make... that
, this is in cairo. it was there last night that supporters and owe points of president mohamed morsi clashed. they hurled rocks and molotov cocktails at each other. at least five people were killed, hundreds injured. the root of the violence is what many believe is morsi's grab for power. ian lee joins us this morning. what's happening right now. >> reporter: we have the elite republican guard, the people tasked with protecting the president. they are putting up barbed wire and road blocks, diverting traffic and people away and trying to keep the two sides, the pro-morsi and the anti-morsi protesters away from each other. last flight we saw thousands of pro-morsi supporters camp outside of the presidential palace, that is after they went there and removed, by force, the anti-morsi protesters. but now we have a small -- protests are planned for today against morsi and their plan to defe descend, again, on the presidential palace. >> a direct constitution has been approved and egyptians are scheduled to vote on it next week. is there something in this proposal that has protesters so angry? >>
become the best friend of the muslim brotherhood in egypt, even as president mohamed morsi was asserting dictatorial powers and his followers were beating up secular liberals in the streets of cairo? when assessing the turbulent events in the arab world, we should remind ourselves that we're witnessing a revolution that may take decades to produce a stable outcome, with the outcome so hard to predict, it's a mistake to make big bets on any particular player. america will help the arab world through this turmoil if it states clearly that u.s. policy is guided by its interests and values, not by transient alliances and friendships. if morsi wants to be treated as a democratic leader, he will have to act like one." and david, i guess we can begin with that question. will he ultimately? can he? and are these fluctuations expected? >> morsi did something that's, in hindsight, a very stupid move. on november 22nd, he announced that he was no longer subject to review by the egyptian courts. and this was read, i think, properly as an attempt to get near dictatorial powers as egypt headed toward
fighting since the election of egypt's mohammed morsi. the army called in the tanks when the protesters got close to the presidential palace. soldiers and armored vehicles shut down a demonstration by both supporters and opponents of the president. they left behind piles of rubble, burning cars, month sense of stability as a major nationwide vote gets one day closer. president morsi said a few hours ago he is going to address the egyptian people. he has not yet, but when that happens, we're going to bring that to you live. >>> nerve agents locked and loaded ready to be used against a syrian people. now, that scenario now a reality. that is according to nbc news. now, it says that syria's military has loaded the component chemicals for the deadly nerve gas into aerial bombs that could be dropped from their fighter jets. i want to bring in paula gorani about this because you have a different take on this. i know there's a lot of breath held. you say that they're not necessarily on that path. >> i believe that there's analysis that is very critical that the assad regime is not getting ready to
to overthrow a dictator of 30 years, even if he was an american ally. and now you have mohamed morsi behaving like a, well, a dictator. and he's now got roughly 39, 40 political parties in egypt rising up against him. it is a mess. >> what you're seeing in places like egypt is the difference between democracy and majoritarianism. winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern, whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he did a power grab. there's now pushback. i think it's wrong to assume, though, that all the people pushing back are necessarily democrats. >> no. >> a lot of people are just going to try to take advantage. >> but everybody's pushing back, and certainly elements of mubarak's regime are looking for an opportunity to regain some power. but you also have coptic christian pushing back, other islamists pushing back, some even more extreme. >> exactly. >> you have all elements pushing back here. i'm absolutely bewildered as to why morsi thought he could get away with this. >> these are guys, morsi, who are either in jail o
waiting for president mohammed morsi to speak. this is after a night of violent clashes that killed six people and killed more than 670 injured. tanks, armored personnel carriers clearing the area, scattering clouds of 0 protesters fighting in the streets. the latest spiral of violence after morsi's sweeping power grab. supporters of the muslim brotherhood who back president morsi clashing with opponents saying he made himself a dictator. reza sayah in cairo, the president not spoken. when he does, what might he say? >> reporter: well, nobody really knows what he's going to say other than members of his inner circle, but certainly, there's a lot of pressure on president morsi to calm down this conflict that's been escalating over a few days, especially the last night. we've eagerly waiting for him to speak, but he hasn't spoken yet. we're not quite sure what the delay is. initially, word was that at 6:00 p.m. local time, three and a half hours ago, he was going to deliver his speech and then reports came that this was going to be a taped speech. taped the address. dlifed it to state med
are true even if mohamed morsi believes them. and one of those things is that there are a lot of old regime people around that have been really working to bring him down from the inside. even paranoids have enemies. he's a deeply paranoid guy right now. but he also is facing a lot of internal enemies. the overwhelming sense i had, mika, from being in egypt is how little the people there know each other. they have a blue states/red states problem that makes ours look like a day at the beach. and that's really -- as the lid has come off and you have these less religious brotherhood people and middle and upper class people from cairo and alexandria, these people do not know each other at all. this country really needs to go on a long weekend retreat. >> yeah, i don't think that's going to happen. you know, we saw the same thing, interestingly enough, in 2009 in iran where you had a lot of people in the cities opposing ahmadinejad, and you had people in more rural areas being far more conservative and supporting ahmadinejad. but carl bernstein, one of morsi's biggest problems right now is we lo
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)